Antsiranana, Madagascar | Cruise port of call | CruiseBe
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Antsiranana, Madagascar

Antsiranana (Malagasy: Antsiran̈ana Malagasy pronunciation: antsʲˈraŋanə̥), named Diego-Suarez prior to 1975, is a city in the far north of Madagascar.

Antsiranana is the capital of Diana Region. 

Antsiranana is situated on Antsiranana Bay, one of the largest deep-water harbors in the Indian Ocean, but the remote location, and, until recently, a bad road to the south, rendered it unimportant for freight traffic.​

History

The bay and city originally used the name Diego Suarez, named after Diogo Soares, a Portuguese navigator who visited the bay in 1543.

In the 1880s, the bay was coveted by France, which desired it as a coaling station for steamships. After the first Franco-Hova War, Queen Ranavalona III signed a treaty on December... Read more

Antsiranana, Madagascar

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Antsiranana (Malagasy: Antsiran̈ana Malagasy pronunciation: antsʲˈraŋanə̥), named Diego-Suarez prior to 1975, is a city in the far north of Madagascar.

Antsiranana is the capital of Diana Region. 

Antsiranana is situated on Antsiranana Bay, one of the largest deep-water harbors in the Indian Ocean, but the remote location, and, until recently, a bad road to the south, rendered it unimportant for freight traffic.​

History

The bay and city originally used the name Diego Suarez, named after Diogo Soares, a Portuguese navigator who visited the bay in 1543.

In the 1880s, the bay was coveted by France, which desired it as a coaling station for steamships. After the first Franco-Hova War, Queen Ranavalona III signed a treaty on December 17, 1885 granting France a protectorate over the bay and surrounding territory, as well as the islands of Nosy-Be and Ste. Marie de Madagascar.

The colony's administration was subsumed into that of Madagascar in 1896. The Second Pacific Squadron of Imperial Russia anchored and was resupplied at Diego-Suarez on its way to the Battle of Tsushima in 1905.

In 1942, Diego Suárez was the primary objective of Operation Ironclad, the starting point of the Allied invasion and capture of Madagascar. The Allies were concerned that Japan would pressure Vichy France into granting use of Madagascar, as they had with French Indo-China during the previous year, and determined that the island should not be made a base for the interdiction of Allied shipping. Diego Suarez, with its superlative harbor and a concentration of government officials, was selected as the initial invasion point. The Japanese responded with an attack by midget submarines on the British naval forces in the harbor, damaging Battleship HMS Ramillies and sinking an oil tanker.

France continued to use the city as a military base after Malagasy independence in 1960 and until the socialist revolution of 1973.


Source:
Text is available under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0

Antsiranana, Madagascar: Port Information


Cruise liners dock close to the center. You can easily reach it on foot.

Get around Antsiranana, Madagascar


You can walk around Antsiranana enjoying scenic views, colonial houses, etc.
Besides, you can explore the city on taxis-brousses.
Taxis and buses are available.

What to do in Antsiranana, Madagascar


Take a sightseeing tour of the city itself.
Spend your day at the beach. By the way, you'll find a great variety of water sports offered there.
Explore the nearby settlements and fantastic national parks. 
Take a boat, nature or hiking tour to merge with the incredible wild nature of the island.

What to eat and drink in Antsiranana, Madagascar


  • Restaurant Le Romazava, Avenue Laly Tollendal.  
  • Coco Pizza, Avenue Laly Tollendal.  
  • Restaurant Le Venilla, Avenue Surcouf.  
  • La Rascasse Hotel, Avenue Surcouf.  
  • La Gastronomie Pizza, Rue Lafayette.  
  • Boulangerie Amicale, Rue Lafayette.  
  • Tourist Hotel Cafe, Avenue Laly Tollendal.  
  • Artisan Boulanger Patisserie, Rue Lafayette.  
  • Boulangerie Mouna, Rue Lafayette. 
  • Hotel du Nord, Avenue Princesse Fatima Achimo. 
  • Hotel La Terrace du Voyageur, Angle Rue du Mozambique.
  • Plaza Hotel, Rue de L'Ankarana.
  • Restaurant Moramora, Rue Sylvain Roux.
  • La Belle Aventure Restaurant, 13 Rue Frappel.
  • Restaurant Le Raphia, 05 Rue Flacourt Place Kabary.
  • Restaurant Shangri-La, Rue Flacourt.
  • Mexi' Coco Bar Resto, Rue Francois de Mahy.
  • Restaurant Le Balafomanga, Rue Louis Brunet. 

Shopping in Antsiranana, Madagascar


You can buy handicrafts and artworks from all over Madagascar, as well as other nice souvenirs.

Safety in Antsiranana, Madagascar


Madagascar is a fairly safe country. You must, however, respect some simple principles:
  • Don't exhibit signs of wealth (cameras, jewels).
  • Similarly, always carry small notes. Paying with large domination notes shows off your wealth, can insult the seller because they will not have a change, and opens you up for becoming a target for crime.
  • Keep an eye on your belongings when using public transport or visiting markets where numerous pickpockets swarm.
  • Learn the Malagasy word for thief, "Mpangalatra" which is pronounced "Pun-gul-ah-tra". If someone is trying to rob you in a busy market area scream this. The fact that a vazaha is screaming thief will unsettle the thief and alert the people near you to help.
  • Always listen for the words "vazaha" or "vazongo" when spoken in low tones. If you hear these words be aware that someone is talking about you, for better or for worse!
  • Like any other developing country, there are a lot of beggars. This is sometimes uncomfortable for tourists, but these people should be respected nonetheless. They are, predictably, attracted to foreigners and will not hesitate to ask for a hand-out. If you don't want to give, a simple "Non, merci" or "Tsy Misy (tsee-meesh)" (I have nothing) will do the trick. If they persist, try shouting "Mandehana! (man-day-han)" (Go Away!) It is recommended not to give money, but other useful items, such as a banana, a piece of bread, etc. It is usually accepted with gratitude, and if the beggar is a child, he will run away with a smile on his face. It is imperative not to encourage begging - in Madagascar the people do not really believe in getting something for nothing and will invariably offer you something first. For example, a chameleon to photograph.

Stay healthy

Visitors to Madagascar should be aware of a vast number of health concerns. Diseases such as the plague, which are almost unheard of elsewhere, still occur in Madagascar. Drinking water is almost never safe for foreigners; treated or bottled water should always be used, and salads or dishes containing unpeeled fruits or vegetables should be avoided. While the AIDS epidemic has not reached the devastating level found in many southern African countries, it is widely assumed that the incidence of AIDS is underestimated and rising, so you should take no risks and avoid unprotected sex in all cases. When swimming, beware of the possibility of human waste in the water, which can cause cholera, typhoid, and a number of other diseases. Leeches and tropical parasites are also a concern.

Research malaria prophylaxis options, and follow through. If you are not taking any prophylactics, be sure to always apply mosquito repellents once dusk sets in. On-skin repellent (only repellents containing ~40% DEET are effective, such as NoBite, or Azeron Before Tropics) is good but should be used in combination with on-clothes repellent (i.e., NoBite). The clothes repellent is odorless approximately an hour after application, and clothes can be washed up to 4 times before it needs to be re-applied. If you wear long-sleeve clothing treated with the repellent and apply on-skin repellent to the skin parts not covered, you will be very safe against mosquito bites and can skip the prophylaxis with its notorious side effects. Take the repellent issue seriously, though, as it's very easy to fall into a more 'relaxed' mode after you've spent some time in the country.

Areas inhabited by humans will invariably have large populations of stray dogs. Avoid stray dogs, and although bites are rare if bitten seek medical assistance promptly as rabies is not unheard of.

Remember that Madagascar is in the tropics and take precautions against sunburn and heat exhaustion seriously. Wear lots of sunscreen and keep hydrated. A cloudy day does not mean you won't get burnt.

Language spoken in Antsiranana, Madagascar


The entire island speaks one language: Malagasy, an Austronesian language. "Malagasy" refers to both the language and the people of the island. Attempts by foreigners to learn and speak Malagasy are liked and encouraged by the Malagasy people. Today, Malagasy is the daily language spoken by 98% of the population in Madagascar, and since 1972, Malagasy has been used as the language of instruction in some schools. As an Austronesian language, Malagasy is more closely related to languages spoken in maritime Southeast Asia and the Pacific islands than to other African languages.

French is the second official language of Madagascar, and most individuals encountered in parks and other touristy areas will speak fluent French.

English is increasingly common and most parks will have at least a few English-speaking guides. Italian, German, Spanish, and Japanese are understood to a lesser extent in areas where tourists are likely to visit.

LOCAL TIME

5:28 pm
October 18, 2019
Indian/Antananarivo

CURRENT WEATHER

22.22 °C / 71.996 °F
broken clouds
Sat

24.72 °C/76 °F
scattered clouds
Sun

24.56 °C/76 °F
few clouds
Mon

24.55 °C/76 °F
few clouds
Tue

26.05 °C/79 °F
broken clouds

LOCAL CURRENCY

MGA

1 USD = 0 MGA
1 EUR = 0 MGA
1 GBP = 0 MGA
1 AUD = 0 MGA
1 CAD = 0 MGA

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