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Corfu (Kerkyra), Greece

Corfu, known also by its Greek name Kerkyra (Κέρκυρα), is the northernmost of the Ionian Islands in Greece. Located off of the far northwest coast of the country, Corfu lies in the Adriatic sea, east of Italy and southwest of Albania. Historically Corfu has been controlled by many foreign powers, notably the Venetians, and British.

Regions

Corfu is 62 km long and at its widest point, nearly 30 km wide. The island is formed by two mountain ranges. The northern runs from the west to east and consists of limestones reached in the

Mount Pantokrator

(914 meters) the maximum height of the island, while the southern mountain range is less high and stretches from north to south. The North of the island is wider and more mountainous. The coastal... Read more

Corfu (Kerkyra), Greece

Destination:

Corfu, known also by its Greek name Kerkyra (Κέρκυρα), is the northernmost of the Ionian Islands in Greece. Located off of the far northwest coast of the country, Corfu lies in the Adriatic sea, east of Italy and southwest of Albania. Historically Corfu has been controlled by many foreign powers, notably the Venetians, and British.

Regions

Corfu is 62 km long and at its widest point, nearly 30 km wide. The island is formed by two mountain ranges. The northern runs from the west to east and consists of limestones reached in the

Mount Pantokrator

(914 meters) the maximum height of the island, while the southern mountain range is less high and stretches from north to south. The North of the island is wider and more mountainous. The coastal areas are well developed with good pebbly beaches. However, the northeast coast has always remained a favorite, aka Kensington on sea. It is also where the island's oldest village 'Old Perithia' is located just beneath Mt. Pantokrator, a Heritage Protected Site in a designated Area of Natural Beauty. The South of the island is less wide (only a few miles across from west to east) and tends to have sandier beaches.

Towns

  • Arillas. A beach resort that still feels like a village. Arillas has a long and wide sandy beach at the northwest corner of Corfu. Beautiful nature, clear waters and a beach offering much privacy. Many naturists have been coming to Arillas for decades because of this, so if you wander off to the left or right side of the beach, be prepared to encounter naked people! Arillas is also developing fast as one of the biggest spiritual spots in the world. There are three spiritual centers offering different courses on meditation, chanting, dancing, creative arts and also many people practicing all kinds of massage. Ideal to relax body, mind, and spirit. The village is also famous for its festivals. The first is held on Ascension day (40 days after Easter, 13 June for 2013), another is held in the first weekend of August and the Wine festival is held on the first weekend of September. Many hundreds of people come to Arillas from all Northern Corfu to enjoy traditional dancing, great souvlakia, local wine, and the famous, fresh Corfu Beer which is produced in the village.
  • Old Perithia. This is the last remaining Heritage Protected Village on the island. Located in the northeast, just below Mt. Pantokrator, the village nestles in A Designated Area of Natural Beauty and records date back to c. 1350. The village is made up of 130 houses and surrounded by 8 churches, it has 4 tavernas and 1 boutique bed & breakfast making it one of the most unique and unspoiled places to stay and a regular feature of the Durrell Week that takes place around May each year as it's perfect for walkers and those interested in flora, fauna, insects, and wildlife. A hideaway from Pirate attacks, the village has views too, but cannot be seen, from the sea, eventually, tourism in the late 1960s and '70s drove villagers towards the coast but it always remained inhabited. Today, locals and visitors alike travel to the village to see the ruins and restorations - the food is 'mountain prices' and often locally sourced. Such is the popularity of the village that Corfiots visit at weekends throughout the winter, to sit around the fires and enjoy the authentic Corfiot dishes. Some of the best beaches on the island are just 20 minutes (8 km) drive away so you can enjoy slip away during the day and return to the peace and quiet of 'your own village' as the sun sets over the mountain tops.
  • Nymphes. A big village with a lot of water, green and legends built on a height of 200 meters. According to a legend, in old times, the Nymphs used to bathe in the village’s waterfalls. A walk to the wells and the waterfalls is enough to make you understand why this legend exists! It is almost certain that you will come across a nymph, too and if you are lucky, you will see her bathe in the water especially in spring. After your walk to the myths, it is a good idea to visit the premises of the Agriculture Co-operative which elaborates kum-kuat and produces liquor and sweets. You will be offered some for free and you will have the chance to try the different liquor qualities (and of course, buy some, if you like). Just outside the village, you can visit Askitario, a small but historic monastery. According to tradition, here lived in the 5th century the monk Artemios Paissios from Epirus, who is said to have worked many wonders.
  • Kynopiastes. A traditional village of the Messi Region of Corfu and only 10 km away from Corfu town and airport, which is a must visit. Old mansions of the 17th to 19th centuries, a marble church, a 17th-century monastery and a museum (and the only one on the island) devoted to the olive tree with one of the world-famous restaurants on the island tavern «Trypas», which has hosted Kings like the Kings of Greece and England, Presidents of Countries like Konstantinos Karamanlis (Greece) and François Mitterrand (France), stars of the European and American cinema and music, like Jane Fonda, Anthony Quinn etc. The narrow tiled paths invite you to walk on them, looking at the small squares and at the houses which preserve the traditional colors. The main church is devoted to the Virgin Mary and it is in the central square. It is a traditional church with unique architecture and an impressive marble entrance. Inside, there are frescoes of the 18th century Ionian School of Painting. At the edge of the village, there is the monastery of Agia Paraskevi, built in the 17th century.
  • Lakones. A typical Corfiot village on the slope of a green hill. You should go for a walk to Bella Vista to admire the view over the bay of Paleokastritsa and relax in one of the picturesque coffee shops. If you like trekking there is a path leading down to Paleokastritsa. The surnames of the inhabitants of the region refer to the soldiers who supported

    Angelokastro

    in the late Byzantine period, as well as to refugees from Mani. Among the houses of the 18th and 19th centuries you will find churches and traditional coffee shops. At the central church, you will see donations of the first emigrants to America of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
  • Roda. Visit the village resort of Roda on Corfu's northern coast. Traditionally a fishing village, the area has retained its character while developing into a popular destination for holidays. Unique in the sense that the old village still exists at the heart of the resort, locals mix with the different nationalities who visit time and time again. Roda is a contained resort, without the typical sprawl. There is plenty of accommodation, bars, restaurants which offer a wide range of menus, typical Greek and Corfiot dishes, Italian, Chinese, and others. Roda is a relaxed resort but has a good nightlife, with nice bands, singers and comedy shows as well as the ever-popular kareoke. If you want a laid back holiday, then Roda is the place, with quiet corners and a beautiful sandy beach, Roda offers something for everyone.
  • Corfu Town. Known in modern Greek as Kerkira or Kerkyra, is the largest and most important town on the island. This is where the airport is located and where most cruise ships and long-distance ferries dock. It is a small, pleasant city catering well to tourists. Its old town is listed on the UNESCO World Heritage List.
  • Benitses. is a very old, traditional fishing village. Benitses lies 12 km south of Corfu Town and leads to the emerald valley. The water of the springs which flow from the mountains of Aghii Deka and Stavros, join together in two small rivers, giving the area the name Pinisse (derived from the ancient Greek word 'Pinio') = Pinitse = Benitses. The mild climate and the natural beauty of Benitses village have attracted a lot of tourists from the beginning of the century. It is only during the last 30 years that tourism has replaced all other sources of income and now is the sole occupation of the inhabitants during the summer season. The coastal road of Benitses is full of hotels, restaurants, cafes and other shops that offering everything the most demanding visitor can ask. Benitses is surrounded by the mountains in one side and the aquamarine waters of the Ionian Sea in the other, this unique combination of nature with the hospitality of the residents, which are very familiar with different cultures, are what make visitors to love the place. 3km to the north there is the famous

    Achilleion Palace

    .
  • Kavos is a seaside village on the island of Corfu in Greece, in the municipal district and the municipality of Lefkimmi. It is now a lively resort heavily devoted to tourism, and popular with young holidaymakers from Britain and Northern Europe
  • Kassiopi. One of the more relaxed and atmospheric resorts with a pretty bay and beach that is mostly stony. The waters are crystal clear and calm. Somewhat spoilt by the prevalence of tacky tourist bars/cafes catering to the many English tourists that crowd the town.
  • Lefkimmi. A village with a wide long sandy beach that is quiet due to being in the less busy South. There's a practical taverna with a children's playground. The waters are extremely calm and very shallow, even out for quite some distance.
  • Kalami. The village is where the British novelist Lawrence Durrell and his wife Nancy Isobel Myers chose to live from 1935 until the Greek surrender in April 1941

The satisfactory infrastructure and the multiple possibilities for various activities are ideal for group holidays on Corfu and the nearby islands. Motivation trips, congress tourism, school trips, Ferrari or antique cars clubs and Harley Davidson groups meet here every year.
Corfu's nature, sea, and history have made sure so that you today, no matter when you come, or how long you will stay, or your style, you will certainly find original and interesting situations to exercise and to have fun. In a place with a tradition in tourism of at least 130 years, with Greek education and the influence of “nobility” from England, France and, surely, Venice, in a place which is used to welcoming the international jet-set for several decades now, the possibilities for sports and amusement are certainly impressive.
Corfu is also a very good destination for family holidays.
Corfu may not have a Disneyland, children's museums, zoos or other things closely connected with children, but the whole island is ideal for children. It's one of the few places in the world, where children are bound to find what they really need: a warm welcome. In Corfu, there are no tropical diseases, criminality, violence, dangerous sea and any other kind of "danger". Children here, as you will see for yourselves, play safely in the streets, in the parks, at the playgrounds, on the beach. The way of life of the Corfiot people is almost in the family. Check this out, and you will see that it is worth bringing here your children some time.

Climate

The climate of the archipelago of Corfu is the warm Mediterranean. The summer here is warm and relatively dry with a blue sky, often cooled by seasonal breezes, offering the ideal conditions for surfing, while rarely is it interrupted by rains. The mountainous areas are cooler. The winter here is mild. Rainfall occurs mainly from November till March. On average, there are 3000 hours of sun per year with an average daily sunshine duration of 8.5 hours.
Spring here is impressive and offers visitors the privilege to enjoy the wealth of vegetation and colors, combined with high-taste tourism.
Easter celebration here becomes the experience of a lifetime.
Summer is the most popular season for Corfu, with beautiful beaches and crystal water for unconcerned hours on the beach.
Autumn is the season of vintage, the period during which the whole island smells of grapes; it may be the best time to get to know the routine of the island.
Christmas and New Year's Day in Corfu is music, hymns, carols, in a quiet, decorated place with a mild climate and a noble finesse.


Source:
Text is available under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0

Corfu (Kerkyra), Greece: Port Information


Cruise ships dock at the New Port. It is about a 20 to 30-minutes walk to the center. You can take a taxi or a shuttle bus.  

Get around Corfu (Kerkyra), Greece


By bus

There are two types of bus in Corfu - Blue buses serve Corfu town and the environs, Green buses serve the rest of the island.
The Blue bus terminal in Corfu Town is in San Rocco Square. The bus information kiosk displays timetables and provides maps showing exactly where the buses terminate (some terminate a few blocks south of the square). Bus stops have electronic displays and self-service ticket machines. Tickets are single-journey only and must be validated on the bus. They can be bought from the machines, or from the driver.
Useful lines include the number 7 which goes to and from Dasia every 20 minutes (30 minutes on Sundays), the 10 which goes to and from Achilion every two hours, the 6 to and from Benitses (not quite hourly) and the 11 to and from Pelekas every 2–3 hours.
The airport bus is No 19 - check the timetable as frequency varies during the day with some big gaps. It is only a ten-minute ride. Number 6 Benitses bus also goes past the end of the airport access road from where it is a 500m walk to the terminal.
The Green Bus Station is near the New Port, from where buses depart for all villages of Corfu Island. Regular departures to Paleokastritsa, Sidari, Kavos, Roda, Acharavi, Kassiopi.

By taxi

There are plenty of taxi lines in Corfu Town.

  • between the Spaniada and the cricket ground.
  • at the heart of the shopping center of the town in Methodiou street
  • at the Old Port
  • at the New Port
  • many others in Gouvia, Dassia, Benitses, Ipsos, the Airport, etc.

And there is a radio taxi which can be reached by phone at +30 26610 33811

By car

You can rent a car through one of many local companies. In general, it is cheaper to pre-book a hire car via the Internet before arriving. Many of the roads are very narrow so it can be better to choose a small car. While there is a good road running North-South along the East coast from Sidari to Lefkimmi and from Corfu town across the island to Paleokastritsa, many roads have poor surfacing. Often the insurance provided for hire cars does not cover damage to the underside of the car so watch out for large holes in the road. Hire car companies often provide a free map but you may find it worth buying one in advance as the maps are not especially good, especially for the North-West interior.

By boat

A great way to explore the island and access beaches that can't be easily accessed otherwise is to rent a boat. Most towns have at least one boat rental company and boats up to 30HP do not require a license to hire.

By bicycle

In the city, traffic is pretty wild and noisy.

An automatic bike sharing scheme, called EasyBike Brainbox was available to rent bicycles. 

By quad bike

There is nothing better than renting a quad bike and driving around the villages, it's a lot of fun and a lot quicker than walking!

What to see in Corfu (Kerkyra), Greece


  • Achilleion (Αχίλλειον). Is a palace built in Corfu by Empress of Austria Elisabeth of Bavaria, also known as Sissi after a suggestion by Austrian Consul Alexander von Watzberg. Sissi was a woman obsessed with beauty and very powerful but tragically vulnerable since the loss of her only son, Crown Prince Rudolf of Austria in the Mayerling affair in 1889. A year later in 1890, she built a summer palace in the region of Gastouri (Γαστούρι), now the municipality of Achilleion, about ten kilometers to the south of the city of Corfu. The palace was designed with the mythical hero Achilles as its central theme.

Beaches

There is a good variety of beaches on Corfu. On the West side of the island, the beaches are sandier while the East tends to have calmer waters. The north-east coast is also home to most of Corfu's upmarket holiday villas.

  • Sidari. A fair sized resort dominated by British tourists. At one end of the beach is the "Canal de l'Amour": sandstone cliffs with narrow inlets, a natural archway and small paths to explore.
  • Dasia and Ipsos. A narrow stony beach with relatively calm waters. The resort runs along the road so there's a good variety of shops and tavernas.
  • Glifada. A long wide sandy beach with fairly rough waters.
  • Pelekas beach. Also a nice sandy beach.
  • San Stefanos beach. A long beautiful beach on the north west of the island, very good for sunbathing as there are loads of sunbeds.
  • Barbati beach. Crystal clear!
  • Chalikounas beach. A very long, virgin stretch of land, caught between Chalikiopoulos' Lake and the Adriatic sea. The natural landscape here is unique, it is a great place to get away from the world and just enjoy both sea and sun.
  • Issos beach. Next to Chalikounas, again on the southwest of Corfu, this beach has a desert motive, because of the high sand hills right next to the seashore. Bring your bike and enjoy the terrain, or just enjoy the panoramic view from high above.
  • Prasoudi beach. High cliffs hang over your head, clean waters and a mix of sand and pebbles. A remote beach that will not leave you unsatisfied.
  • Mesongi beach.

What to do in Corfu (Kerkyra), Greece


  • Aqualand. Agios Ioannis. It's quite a small water park with only a few main "rides". It is best to travel to and from the park under your own steam as a whole day there with an organized trip might be too long.
  • Walk the Corfu Trail. Corfu is an ideal location for a keen walker. The North is fairly rugged with Mt. Pantokrator, the highest mountain, and beneath it Corfu's oldest village, Ano (Upper)Perithia. At the other extreme is Korission Lake in the South; an inland lake, separated by a thin sand bar from the sea. The Corfu Trail is a 222 km long distance footpath covering the full length of the islands. The route is well signed and a book accompanies the trail, there is also an introduction, history and walking guide for Old Perithia, Corfu's oldest village which you pass through on the Corfu Trail.
  • Meditation. There are several meditation centers on Corfu, and many people practicing massage and giving all kinds of sessions, from deep tissue massage to craniosacral and psychic massage.
  • Massage. There are many people practicing massage and giving all types of sessions, from deep tissue massage, relaxation, Reiki therapy. One center is Arillas in the northwest of the island but there are also places in and close to Corfu town offering courses and sessions as well as mobile massage therapists who come to your villa, apartment or even boat/yacht.
  • Yachting. There is a lot of yachting going on in Corfu and the Ionian, it's an ideal spot due to calm weather conditions, Magic Islands, and fun people. Corfu and Ionian, in general, is an ideal place for sailing and yachting with steady fair winds all summer long. Motoryacht Pyewacket is the newest addition in Gouvia Marina, it's a 20m motor charter yacht made by sunseeker with two professional UK/Dutch Crew members on their third season in the Ionian. Another operator is the Discovery Yachting offering yachts for sailing in the Ionian.

What to eat and drink in Corfu (Kerkyra), Greece


Eat

Eat at Agni Bay either in the evenings or during the day, arrive on foot or by boat, there are 3 places to eat on the beach all excellent, some of the best food ever. Water Taxis run some evenings from some of the surrounding villages. Very Romantic, but prices are high here. A very special place to be. As featured in Gerald Durrells ' My Family and Other Animals'

  • Klimataria or Grapevine, benitses (opposite blue bus stop in benitses), ☎ +30 2661071201. 7 PM-11 PM. If you aren't a seafood fan then this restaurant might not appeal to you as there are limited alternatives, although there is a good selection for vegetarians. Its a family run business and the setting, a very old building, must be the most photographed building in Benitses. Eat early to get a table as the locals rarely eat before 22.00.
  • To Fagopotion, Agios Stefanos. Worth visiting but praise in the Guardian newspaper on 13 09 08 (ostentatiously displayed at the entrance )may have gone to chef Christos Vlachos' head. Don't let him bully you. Some of the cooking is good, some is ordinary, and some has the feel of leftovers from the night before.

Drink

Gingerbeer. Corfu was a British protectorate and gingerbeer is one of the British style drinks that the locals adopted with enthusiasm. The Greek version is simply excellent. Ask for it at Liston or better restaurants and coffee houses. Locally it is called "Tsitsibeera"
Corfu Beer. In Arillas, in the north of Corfu, there is the Corfu Microbrewery. They produce four different kinds of beer, all of them unpasteurized (so they have to be drunk within a couple of months of their production) and all of them delicious! They are so good that they were selected by J.D. Wetherspoon to produce Koroibos Beer, exclusively for the London Olympics. You can visit the brewery and have a taste of their beers. Better give them a call in advance at +30 26630 52072

Shopping in Corfu (Kerkyra), Greece


As elsewhere in Greece, olive wood, ceramic and leather goods are common. In addition to many tourist shops in places such as Corfu town, you will find small shops along some of the more major roads, often combined with the factory/workshop. In some remoter areas, you may find locals selling locally produced wine, honey and olive oil from small street-side stalls.

Safety in Corfu (Kerkyra), Greece


Greece is a relatively safe destination for the traveler: the vast majority of people you interact with will be honest and helpful, however, there is absolute carnage on the roads. The detailed information below is intended to forewarn travelers of risks which they have a small, though not zero, the chance of encountering.

Crime and theft
Violent crime and theft rates are very low; public disorder is rare, and public drunkenness is generally frowned upon. Visitors should rest assured that this is an extremely safe and friendly destination, but it is always advisable for foreign tourists to exercise basic precautionary measures just as they would at home. There has recently been a spike in theft (at least a perceived one), which some locals will not hesitate to blame on the influx of immigrants. 

The places where the visitor is most likely to encounter crime and theft are probably the handful of overcrowded and overheated, tourist resorts thronged with younger foreigners attracted by cheap flights, cheap rooms, and cheap booze. Most visitors to these places return home unmolested, but there have been increasing reports from them of theft, public indecency, sexual assault, and alcohol-fueled violence; both the perpetrators and victims are usually young foreigners, though sometimes locals are involved. Authorities have stepped up police presence in such areas to crack down on these activities. Still, visitors to these places would do well to avoid anything that looks like trouble, especially late at night, and to remember that their own overindulgence in alcohol increases their chance of attracting trouble themselves.

Scams
The most commonly reported major scam against travelers is the Greek version of the old clip joint routine. A single male traveler will be approached, usually at night in a neighborhood where there are a lot of bars, by a friendly Greek who will strike up a conversation leading to an invitation to go to "this really cool bar I know" for a drink. Once at the bar, they are joined by a couple of winsome ladies who immediately begin ordering drinks, often champagne, until, at the end of the evening, the mark is presented with an astronomical bill, payment of which is enforced by the sudden appearance of a pair of glowering thugs. The reason this scam works because most Greeks have a tradition of being friendly to visitors, and almost all Greeks who strike up a conversation with you will have no ulterior motives. But if you're a single male traveler approached by a Greek in the circumstances described above, it's safest to politely but firmly decline any invitations.

Photography restrictions
It is strictly forbidden to take photos of military installations or other strategic locations. Authorities will take violations quite seriously. Obey signs prohibiting photography. In fact, it would be best not to take photographs of anything of military significance, including Greek navy ships, or of airports or any aircraft, even civilian ones: Greek authorities can be very sensitive about such things. Many museums prohibit photography without a permit; some prohibit only flash or tripod photography, and many ask visitors not to take photos of objects (statues, etc.) which include people standing by them, as this is considered disrespectful. Officials at museums will rush over to yell at you if they see a camera or even a cell phone in your hand.

Antiquities
Greece also has very strict laws concerning the export of antiquities, which can include not only ancient objects but also coins, icons, folk art, and random pieces of stone from archeological sites. Before buying anything which could conceivably be considered an antiquity, you should become familiar with the current laws regarding what can be taken out of the country. Briefly, all objects made before 1830 are considered antiquities and are protected by the Ministry. Do not ever think to export or buy any piece of archeological value because it will be either be a fake or you will be arrested promptly at the airport for trafficking of goods of archeological value.

Drugs
Greece has some of the strictest and most strictly enforced, drug laws in Europe, and tourists are not exempt. No matter what anyone tells you, it is most definitely not cool to do drugs in Greece, including marijuana. Furthermore, such a behavior is strongly rejected by locals and will almost certainly cause someone call the Police and have you arrested. Note that even a very small quantity is enough to get you in serious trouble as Greek law makes almost no distinction between use, possession, and trafficking. Don't even think of offering even the smallest amount of drug to someone else. Undercover cops abound and once caught you are certain to be prosecuted with charges of drug dealing, leading to several years of imprisonment!

Traffic
The greatest danger to travelers in Greece is probably in the simple process of crossing the street: traffic can be bad even in smaller towns and horrendous in Athens and other Greek cities, and accident rates are high. Caution should be exercised by pedestrians, even when crossing on a pedestrian crossing. 1400 people are killed on Greek roads each year - a statistic that is one of the highest in the European Union. Most of this is attributed to aggressive driving habits. Drivers often weave between lane to the lane of traffic to waste less time. Stay safe.

Stay healthy

Sexually transmitted infections
STIs exist in Greece as elsewhere, and travelers who may engage in sexual activity while visiting Greece should remember that even if one is on vacation and one's sexual partner is also a traveler, perhaps from one's own country, neither of these facts suspend the laws of biology. Condoms are available at any pharmacy and at many kiosks.

Natural Dangers
More than 250 people are drowned each summer in Greece while swimming, many of them being foreign visitors. Also many more suffered non reversable health issues due to "almost drown" incidents. Greece has the highest number of drownings in Europe. You need to never overestimate your physical strength when swimming. Before your visit search carefully the internet for all the measuares you shall take to avoid such situations in the sea or even the pools.

Sun and heat pose risks that summer visitors should take precautions for. Take a good, light sun hat and sun glasses, and drink plenty of water.

In late spring and summer, the government runs public service announcements on television reminding Greeks to wear their sunblock at the beach. The Mediterranean sun tends to get quite strong, and can burn skin that has not been exposed to the sun for a long time. Any excessive daily sun exposure can also cause long-term damage to skin. Sunblock and sunscreen are widely available throughout Greece at supermarkets, grocery stores, pharmacies, and special stores selling beach-related items, though they tend to be expensive, and the higher SPF factor blocks can be hard to find.

During the hottest months, while visiting archeological sites, wear tank tops, carry umbrellas, and carry water. Daily high temperatures stay at about 95-100°F (35-38°C). 

Jellyfish periodically infest some beaches and their stings can be severe. The red ones are particularly dangerous. Sea urchins are common along the Greek coast, usually clinging to underwater flat surfaces such as smooth rocks and sea walls. They usually inhabit shallow water so they're easy to see. Care should be taken not to step on them, since their spines can be painful.

It's inadvisable to go hiking cross country in Greece alone: even in popular places, the countryside can be surprisingly deserted, and if you get in trouble while you're out of sight of any houses or roads, it could be a long time before anyone notices you.

Lifeguards are rare at Greek beaches, though most of them where people congregate to swim are locally considered safe. Some beaches have shallow water a long way from the shore; others suddenly shelve steeply. If in doubt about safe swimming conditions, ask locally.

There are no required inoculations for Greece and the water is almost everywhere safe. Look for 'Blue Flags' at beaches for the highest quality water (which tend to also have good sand and facilities)

Language spoken in Corfu (Kerkyra), Greece


Greek is the national official language and is the native tongue of the vast majority of the population, but the English speaking visitor will encounter no significant language problem. English is the most widely studied and understood foreign language in Greece, spoken by more than 50% of its population, followed by French, Italian, and German. Basic knowledge of English can be expected from almost all personnel in the tourism industry and public transport services, as well as most Greeks under the age of 40. However, learning a few Greek terms, such as "hello" and "thank you" will be warmly received.

The Latin and Cyrillic alphabets were derived from the Greek alphabet and about half of Greek letters look like their Latin counterparts, especially capitals letters, and most Greek letters resemble their Cyrillic counterparts. With a bit of study, it's not too hard to decipher written names, and common terms such as "hotel", "cafeteria", etc. And you'll find that place names on road signs throughout the country are often transliterated into Latin letters (some signs, especially on the newer roads, are even outright translated into English). Basically, the closest to Athens (and borders) you are, the most likely you'll find a Latin transcription on signs. Some letters could also be tricky, as they are identical in shape to another Latin letter with another value, such as "Η" and "Ρ", which stand respectively for "I/E" and "R".

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August 25, 2019
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Achilleion (Greek: Αχίλλειο or Αχίλλειον) is a palace built in Gastouri, Corfu by Empress (German: Kaiserin) of Austria Elisabeth of Bavaria, also...
By Dr.K. - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=16739111 Museum of Asian art of Corfu, Greece
Average: 9.2 (10 votes)

The Museum of Asian Art of Corfu is a museum in the Palace of St. Michael and St. George in Corfu, Greece. The only museum in Greece dedicated to the...
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0 ||| Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Saint Spyridon Church, Corfu (Kerkyra), Greece
Average: 9.6 (10 votes)

The Saint Spyridon Church is a Greek Orthodox church located in Corfu, Greece. It was built in the 1580s. It houses the relics of Saint Spyridon and...
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0 ||| Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Gardiki Castle, Corfu, Greece
Average: 9.1 (10 votes)

Gardiki Castle (Greek: Κάστρο Γαρδικίου) is a 13th-century Byzantine castle on the southwestern coast of Corfu and the only surviving medieval...
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0 ||| Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Mount Pantokrator, Corfu (Kerkyra), Greece
Average: 9.5 (10 votes)

Mount Pantokrator (sometimes Pantocrator, Pantōkrator, Παντοκράτωρ in Greek) is a mountain located in north-eastern Corfu. At 906 metres (2,972 ...
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0 ||| Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Palace of St. Michael and St. George, Corfu (Kerkyra), Greece
Average: 9 (10 votes)

Palace of St. Michael and St. George is a palace in Corfu City on the island of Corfu, Greece. The Greek name is "Palaia Anaktora" (Παλαιά Ανάκτορα:...

Latest travel blogs about Corfu (Kerkyra), Greece




My Premiere Cruise on MS Koningsdam. P.2


Let's continue our cruise (My Premiere Cruise on MS Koningsdam. P.1)! We departed from Corfu and headed to the opposite shore, towards Albania. My fellow travelers were enjoying sweet baked rolls, and I went to take pictures of open decks to avoid doing that: Promenade deck is so narrow in...

I'd like to tell you about my first cruise on new MS Koningsdam . The background is the next: my husband appointed his medical issues on the spring, so he left me to meet the new vessel called MS Koningsdam on my own. But is there anyone who sets cruises alone? I began to look for a...
The Corfu beaches lay at the bottom of the monastery. There are both pebble and sandy beaches here. Below is a pebble beach: A sandy beach: A view from the pier: Corfu beach from the pier: The bus takes visitors to  Costa Victoria . The cruise liner...
A view of the Vlaherna Monastery situated on "Mouse Island" from the observation deck, as well as some of the coastline of Corfu: An airstrip nearby. The Paleokastritsa monastery, located high in the mountains, is still operational: Flourishing Bougainvillea: On ...
The island of  Corfu: Costa Victoria: Corfu Island:  The French built a park here during Napoleon's reign. The streets are built like those in Paris. Some aspects if the Parisian style are present: Saint Spyridon Church - the church of the patron saint...

Corfu (Kerkyra), Greece shore excursions



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