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Cruises. Historical Digest

8 minutes read • April 11th, 2017
Recently we have released a series of articles about the

history of cruises

.
We’ve tried to create an exciting excursion for the fans of cruises. Excursion from the first transatlantic sailings to the most up-to-date liners.
We’d like to combine all the information in this article!
Here’s a historical digest.
history of cruises

The 19th century marked the beginning of the regular passenger transportation across the Atlantic. Black Ball Line, P&O, and Cunard became the pioneers of the industry.
history of cruises

The ships sailed not only across the Atlantic but also in the Mediterranean Sea!
history of cruises

The P&O company was the innovator in the industry.
They were the first to build a steel cruise liner in 1881 – SS Ravena. They were also the first to launch a ship with electric lighting – SS Valetta (1889). They were the first to offer pleasure trips and the first to organize cruises all year round.
history of cruises

The White Star Line company founded in 1845 has joined the historical records forever. Her ships repeatedly fought for the Blue Ribbon of the Atlantic.
history of cruises

By the end of the 19th century, the leading cruise companies formed the image of transatlantic liners familiar to us from the movies...
RMS Campania (1893) – Cunard Line
history of cruises

Oceanic (II) (1899) – White Star Line
history of cruises

You can find more information about this stage of history of cruise industry, as well as German superliners, here:

History of Cruises. Part 1. Origin

.
history of cruises

Next, we talked about the rapid development of the industry at the beginning of the 20th century.
RMS Celtic, RMS Cedric, RMS Baltic & RMS Adriatic – these names had long been associated with the greatness of the White Star Line company.
history of cruises

German ships of that time were not inferior in terms of their luxury and size: for example, SS Kaiserin Auguste Victoria of Hamburg America Line became the largest cruise liner of her time.
history of cruises

RMS Lusitania & RMS Mauretania has left their marks in history forever!
history of cruises

Well, we all know about Olympic and Titanic!
history of cruises

Golden times ended with the tragedy of Titanic and the beginning of the First World War.
You can find more information about this time, and how the megaliners survived the terrible war, here: History of Cruises. Part 2. The Rise and Fall.
history of cruises

After the First World War, the industry rose from the ashes like Phoenix.
German companies lost almost all of their liners: a part of them sank, another was lost in the form of reparations.
history of cruises
SS Imperator was sold by the Americans to Cunard in 1919.
 
English companies lost many cruise liners.
However, in just a few years, the remaining and new ships breathed new life into the industry.
history of cruises

Prohibition affected the popularity of a cruise vacation among the Americans. Booze Cruises became frequent.
history of cruises

France actively joined the arena of cruises in the 1930s.
history of cruises

Oddly enough, the Third Reich became a certain innovator. Cruises organized for German workers became common in Germany.
history of cruises
Bundesarchiv, Bild 102-11081 / CC-BY-SA 3.0
 
Italy also made a lasting impression with its beautiful SS Rex!
history of cruises

The French dumbfounded the world with their new megaliner – SS Normandie.
history of cruises

RMS Queen Mary became a ship from another timelike dimension!
history of cruises

The beginning of the second terrible war for 50 years, as well as the course of history, significantly influenced the cruise market, and the entire world.
history of cruises

You can read more information about this stage of the cruise industry development here: History of Cruises. Part 3. Déjà vu.
history of cruises

We do not even want to describe the years of the terrible war...
In total, according to the most conservative estimates, more than 50 ocean liners sank during the war years. More than 90,000 people died!
history of cruises

You can read more about this period in the history of cruise ships here: History of Cruises. Part 4. Sic transit gloria mundi.
history of cruises

There always comes progress after a period of decline.
It happened in our case as well...
After the terrible war, the cruise industry rose from the ashes again.
Although almost all the companies lost their fleets, the new ones were launched pretty quickly.
history of cruises

It was greatly influenced by the US authorities that began to subsidize the construction of new cruise liners.
The threat of the new war with the USSR was also one of the incentives. It was necessary to restore the transport fleet urgently and the best option was to revive the cruise industry. They could quickly turn the cruise ships into the military ones in case of need. Unfortunately, they had done it twice in the last 50 years.
history of cruises

The German companies also got back on track pretty quickly.
history of cruises

As well as the French.
history of cruises

The 65,000-ton liner called SS France became the most modern transatlantic liner.
history of cruises

After some time, she also became the largest liner intended only for cruises, but already under the

Norwegian Cruise Line

flags.
history of cruises
Photo by: Dr. Karl-Heinz Hochhaus/Wiki/CC BY 3.0 
 
Some liners of that time are still in service!
history of cruises
Photo by: Pjotr Mahhonin/Wiki/CC BY-SA 4.0
 
In general, the industry was booming, but it was still oriented towards the Transatlantic sailings...
In the late 1970s, the regular Boeing-747 flights finally buried the industry.
Or rather, it became the industry as we know it.
history of cruises

Finally, modern companies appeared.

Princess Cruises

(1965) the first ships of which were Princess Patricia, Princess Italia & Princess Carla.
Princess Italia
history of cruises
Photo by: Gordon Dalzell/Wiki/CC BY-SA 4.0 

Norwegian Cruise Line (1966).
The company started with several small ships – Sunward (1966), Starward, Skyward, Seaward, Southward, Sunward II.
The largest of them was just over 17,000 tons.
history of cruises
Starward (1968)

Royal Caribbean International (1968).
Song of the Norway became the first ship of the company.
history of cruises
Photo by: Tony Garner/Wiki/CC BY-SA 4.0
 
You can read more about this period here: History of Cruises. Part 5. Between the War and Boeing 747.
history of cruises

Finally, you can find more information about the present of the cruise industry here: History of Cruises. Part 6. The Future Has Come.
history of cruises

We won’t even mention it briefly! :) Respect our work and click on the link! ;)
Indeed, it’s really interesting, how in forty some years the cruise world has changed from Mardi Gras
history of cruises
Mardi Gras (Carnival Cruise Line). © René Beauchamp/Wiki/CC BY-SA 3.0
 
To…
Symphony of the Seas
history of cruises

Quantum of the Seas and the Quantum-class.
Bionic, robotic bars, observation platforms, animated screens appeared on the ship for the first time.
history of cruises

Carnival Vista and SkyRide.
history of cruises
Photo by: Hnapel/Wiki/CC BY-SA 4.0

Celebrity Edge.
history of cruises
Photo: Celebrity Cruise Line

Norwegian Project Leonardo.
history of cruises
Photo: Norwegian Cruise Line
 
You can read about this part here: History of Cruises. Part 6. The Future Has Come.
 
If you liked the articles about the history of cruise liners, please like and share! ;) We will really appreciate it!

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