Great Stirrup Cay, Bahamas | Cruise port of call | CruiseBe
0
No votes yet

Great Stirrup Cay, Bahamas

Great Stirrup Cay is a 268-acre (108 ha) island that is part of the Berry Islands in the Bahamas.

Norwegian Cruise Line

purchased the island from the Belcher Oil Company in 1977 and developed it into a private island for their cruise ship passengers. The northern part of the island has a sandy beach surrounded by rocks with snorkeling areas. The southern part features a helicopter airfield (with a sign reading "Great Stirrup Cay International Airport"), a large area without vegetation, and numerous concrete blocks. These are all remnants of a previous U.S. military installation and satellite tracking station. The island's lighthouse was originally constructed in 1863 by the Imperial Lighthouse Service. Great Stirrup Cay is adjacent to Little Stirrup Cay, 

Royal Caribbean Cruises

' private... Read more

Great Stirrup Cay, Bahamas

Destination:
Great Stirrup Cay is a 268-acre (108 ha) island that is part of the Berry Islands in the Bahamas.

Norwegian Cruise Line

purchased the island from the Belcher Oil Company in 1977 and developed it into a private island for their cruise ship passengers. The northern part of the island has a sandy beach surrounded by rocks with snorkeling areas. The southern part features a helicopter airfield (with a sign reading "Great Stirrup Cay International Airport"), a large area without vegetation, and numerous concrete blocks. These are all remnants of a previous U.S. military installation and satellite tracking station. The island's lighthouse was originally constructed in 1863 by the Imperial Lighthouse Service. Great Stirrup Cay is adjacent to Little Stirrup Cay, 

Royal Caribbean Cruises

' private island.

History

Great Stirrup Cay, along with the rest of the Bahamas, was formed by tectonic and glacial shifting. The first known settlers to the Bahamas were the Lucayan Indians, relatives of the Arawaks who populated the Caribbean around 600 A.D.

Great Stirrup was a pirate hideout while the British settled in Nassau and the larger islands until 1815. This time marks the first documented settlers of Great Stirrup, and many of the structures from this settlement still stand today. Charts of this era show simply "Stirrup's Cay".

"Stirrup's Cay" remained active during the American Civil War, as the Confederates wished to continue to export cotton to Europe. The island was used as a landfall for provisioning while Federal warships patrolled the area to thwart their efforts. After the abolition of slavery, the British began to slowly withdraw from the out island colonies, and the plantation at Great Stirrup was abandoned. Great Stirrup is the northernmost island in a chain of islands known as the Berry Islands and is situated in an area along the Northwest Providence Channel. In 1863, the Imperial Lighthouse Service erected the lighthouse on Great Stirrup Cay. The lighthouse site was manned for many years, but it is now timed and solar powered, making it self-sufficient. The structure stands nearly 80 feet, and its light is visible for over 20 miles.

United States President Franklin D. Roosevelt fished off the reefs of Great Stirrup Cay in 1935.

During World War II the United States, in an effort to protect its eastern shores, came to the Bahamas and Great Stirrup with a wide array of observational and defensive equipment. Among these were submersible cables, which were run along the ocean floor to listen for enemy submarines. Two "cable houses" still stand on the southeastern shore of the island, now overgrown by jungle. The United States Air Force later constructed a satellite tracking station. This facility was later leased to Motorola and other private sector companies. New technology has made the station obsolete, and it was closed in 1991.

Belcher Oil Company of Miami staked claim to the north section of the island for many years. Their interests there included real estate speculation, oil exploration, and a possible site for a corporate retreat. In 1977, Norwegian Caribbean Lines (later Norwegian Cruise Line) leased this section from Belcher Oil, the first time a cruise line had exclusive control of a private island. Norwegian Caribbean Line bought the island in 1986. In 1990, Norwegian Cruise Line spent $1 million on upgrades to the island and, for a few years, it started marketing the island as Pleasure Island. In 2017, Norwegian Caribbean Lines built new food and drink areas, rebuilt cabanas, and expanded the beach areas. Norwegian Caribbean Lines plans to build 38 private villas with up to two bedrooms each, a two-story restaurant, a swim-up bar, and a spa area.

Flora and fauna

The most common tree on the island is the coconut palm, which produces a cloudy milk and a sweetmeat used in many island recipes. Another fruit-bearing tree is the Sea Grape.

Wildlife

Some of the creatures found on the island include several different varieties of lizard and land crab. Gulls, frigates, and sanderlings are the most prevalent bird species.

Great Stirrup Cay is a protected marine life sanctuary, and removal of anything from the water is strictly prohibited.

Climate

Great Stirrup Cay has a tropical climate. The daytime average temperatures from December to April are around 75 °F (24 °C), while the average daily temperature is between 85–93 °F (29–34 °C) from May to November.

The average rainfall is 1 inch (2.5 cm) per month from November to April and 3.5 inches (10 cm) per month from May to October.

The average sea temperature from May to November is 81–86 °F (27–30 °C); it averages 77 °F (25 °C) from December to April.

July averages the most hours of sunshine, while September through February averages the least hours of sunshine, with 7 to 8 hours per day.


Source:
Text is available under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0

Great Stirrup Cay, Bahamas: Port Information


Cruise ships anchor offshore, passengers are transported ashore by tender boats.
Everything is within walking distance. 
 

Get around Great Stirrup Cay, Bahamas


This private port is a beach getaway. You can easily explore it on foot. However, there's nothing special to look at.

What to see in Great Stirrup Cay, Bahamas


Relax on a beach, admire nature and breathtaking scenery. Explore the marina's incredible underwater world.

What to do in Great Stirrup Cay, Bahamas


  • Spend time on beautiful white sand beaches
  • Snorkeling, diving, kayaking, parasailing, and other water activities
  • Eco-tours on the boats
  • Zip Line
  • Relax in cozy Cabanas

What to eat and drink in Great Stirrup Cay, Bahamas


The port has several cozy bars serving delicious food and drinks. Everything is included. If not, you can pay with your cruise card.

Shopping in Great Stirrup Cay, Bahamas


There is a small Straw Market in the port. There you can buy local Bahamian crafts, clothes, souvenirs, presents, etc.

Safety in Great Stirrup Cay, Bahamas


Great Stirrup Cay is a private island, so it is safe, and you are very unlikely to experience any trouble during your visit.

Language spoken in Great Stirrup Cay, Bahamas


English is the main language.

LOCAL TIME

10:46 pm
June 16, 2019
America/Nassau

CURRENT WEATHER

27.22 °C / 80.996 °F
light rain
Mon

25.75 °C/78 °F
heavy intensity rain
Tue

27.75 °C/82 °F
heavy intensity rain
Wed

27.45 °C/81 °F
moderate rain
Thu

28.35 °C/83 °F
sky is clear

LOCAL CURRENCY

USD

1 EUR = 0 USD
1 GBP = 0 USD
1 AUD = 0 USD
1 CAD = 0 USD

Latest travel blogs about Great Stirrup Cay, Bahamas



Great Stirrup Cay, Bahamas by Jim Pennucci/Flickr/CC BY 2.0

Exciting Video of Great Stirrup Cay Cruise Port


Dear friends! We continue to get acquainted with private paradise islands of cruise companies. We should warn you that these ports are open exclusively to cruise travelers so be ready to start dreaming of a cruise after reading this article. This time we’ll talk about the Great Stirrup Cay cruise...