Luxurious Monaco (Monte Carlo) | CruiseBe
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Luxurious Monaco

Sergey Dolya • 6 minutes read • April 9th, 2016

If you think you’re successful and wealthy, you’re welcome to visit Monaco and realize you’re not. :) Where else can you find Bentley and Ferrari rental in the little kiosk on the quay?
Monaco is the second smallest country after Vatican. Generally speaking, Monaco is one bay hidden between high mountains. The whole country is situated on its banks.
Houses are mostly multi-storeyed but very anonymous and shapeless:
Aquatory of this bay is full with motor boats and yachts.
Sometimes you can find rather interesting examples.
The population of Monaco is only 35 thousand of citizens. It is divided into few quarters: Old town (Monaco-Ville), La Condamine (business center and the bay itself), Fontvieille (artificially constructed district eastern to France) and 

Monte-Carlo 

– casinos and nightclubs.
We started our tour from the Old town. It is built on the plain peak of the mountain along the waterline. There is a picturesque walking path at the bottom.
We got to the top by lift and entered the 

Oceanographic Museum

.
There’s a beautiful aquarium in the basement.
All the skeletons of sea animals and diving equipment are collected upstairs.
After we left the museum, we got on a tourist train and drove around the whole country in half an hour.
At noon we watched the ceremony of changing of the guards on the Palace Square in front of the Prince Palace.
There are 82 guardsmen in the army of Monaco. It is the one and only country where the army is less than its military orchestra of 85 men. "Around the World" magazine, 1980:
It was 1962 when Monaco was almost destroyed. General de Gaulle, the President of France, threatened the principality to cut off electricity and water supply if it wouldn’t stop poaching bankers to their side and didn't implement profit tax. 80 guardsmen of the Royal Palace and 207 policemen were ready for a conflict. Fortunately, the war didn’t start as prince made concessions.
Frankly speaking, I expected more synergy in the actions of local guardsmen.
You can enjoy a marvelous view of the artificially created Fontvieille right from here.
We were going down by the pedestrian serpentine and only then we got to a small market.
May lilies were sold there. Aren’t they in the Red Book actually? 
You can wash your fruits or hands right near the marketplace. 
After trying a genetically modified strawberry with wild strawberry’s flavor, we went to 

Monte-Carlo

.
A policeman passed us on his motorcycle.
There are a lot of posh cars in the city. I couldn’t identify this one.
And this is Lamborghini! Tellingly, people in these cars smile a lot and look very happy.
We visited Monaco only a few weeks before the F1 Monaco Grand Prix. The preparation usually takes 6 weeks, and then 2 weeks are spent on dismantlement of all constructions. All preparations will be described in another article.  
The heart of Monte-Carlo is the oldest casino in the whole Europe.
Outside the entrance, there is a huge glass semi-sphere and it seems that it is stolen from the Matrix and is made of hot mercury.
A small parking lot in front of the casino is taken over by luxury cars.
We dined in the famous Café De Paris near the Casino.
My kid was impressed with the system of disinfection of a toilet saddle. The same system was installed in the bathroom of Tabakovsky restaurant of Oblomov in Moscow, but it probably broke, and toilet bowls were replaced with regular ones.
A park with very elegant sculptures in front of the casino.
For some unknown reason, you can't take photos using tripod in the park.
On our way back to the ship, we went across the whole country from west to east.
Right on the quay, there is a little white kiosk. There you can rent Bentley or Ferrari. 
The whole quay is filled with stands for F1. The track runs on the edge and some stands are built over the water:
In the next article, I’ll show you parts of the race and construction of stands for F1. Stay Tuned!
Author: Sergeydolya
Source: sergeydolya.livejournal.com
Translated by: Gian Luka

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