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Macau – Asian Las Vegas

Sergey Dolya • 6 minutes read • March 30th, 2016
Macau is the gambling capital of Asia. It is a small island country with a population of half a million people and 31 huge casinos. For 442 years it was a Portuguese colony and only in 1999 Portuguese handed over the reins of power to the Chinese government. However, it is now considered a separate country with its own visas, money, and customs. 
The first half of the day I spent at the exhibition and in the afternoon went to Macau by helicopter. You can get there by ferry, but it's not fast and fun.
The helicopter flies to Macau every half an hour. All the fun lasts only 16 minutes. We were transported by helicopter Sikorsky S76C+.
It was my first helicopter flight and I was a little worried, but everything went great. In the helicopter, there were only 12 seats and 2 pilots. All sat down, buckled up and the pilot pulled us away from the earth. First, we slowly and smoothly rose up to a height of couple meters and then sharply as on express elevator rose to the height of 170 meters. Then we tipped nose forward and raced toward Macau:
Our flight was at an altitude of 300 meters and at a speed of 270 km/h:
The excitement passed after 5 minutes and I got a real pleasure from the flight. Blades were uniformly and calming threshing from above. The weather was foggy and closer to Macau we were flying as in milk, but pilots "didn't miss". The landing was very soft.
We were the only passengers at the customs in Macau. I bought a visa for 100 HKD and set foot on the 46th foreign country:
Just as in Moscow, I was surrounded by a bunch of taxi drivers offering "to show the city". They were armed with photos of their vehicles and tourist maps with directions and pictures. I chose the first available and loaded at his Toyota. The movement in Macau as in 

Hong Kong 

is left driving. 
My first stop was a monument erected by the Chinese government after Macau transfer under the jurisdiction of China. Casino shines in the background:
Next, I visited the monument erected by the Portuguese government in honor of the same event. I liked the Portuguese one better:
From all points of the city you can see a huge Lisbon Casino in the form of a burning torch:
Among the attractions in Macau there is another tower and ruins of St. Paul's Cathedral, built in 1602:
Near ruins, I noticed a meditating woman, right on the sidewalk. Passing tourists did not confuse her at all. It seemed like she was preparing to fly:
There is a lot of social advertisement in the city. It is painted directly on the fences:
For the longest time I could not understand what the following advertisement meant:
And then I saw this miracle dog toilet next to the Buddhist temple:
Downtown is very similar to a provincial Portuguese town – narrow streets, cobbled pavement, and European architecture.
The number of scooters in the city can surpass even 

Rome

:
Macau has its own beer, but after I took a couple sips, I abandoned the idea to finish this jar because it tasted disgusting:
All taxis in the country are numbered:
Macau is bordered with China. Distant white houses are already China:
The border runs right through town and many people are traveling every day there and back:
Moreover, by foot!
There are many almsmen and beggars on the streets:
During my tour, I saw 2 weddings:
40% of state income comes from a gambling tax.
I returned back by helicopter too, but it was already after dark:
It is forbidden to photograph with flash during flight, but pilots agreed to pose for me when we were on the ground:
In the evening I watched the laser show again, but on the other side of Victoria Bay:
Well, that's all. Finally a couple of 

Hong Kong 

night photos:
In the next review, read about Hong Kong subway (it is unusual), amusement Park visit and Avenue of Stars.
Author: Sergeydolya
Source: 
sergeydolya.livejournal.com

Translated by: Gian Luka

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