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Santa Marta, Tayrona Nature Reserve & Surf Camp On The Caribbean Sea. P.2.

Pingvin_fly • 6 minutes read • November 4th, 2015

Parque Nacional Natural Tayrona

:
Tayrona Nature Reserve is the main attraction of

Santa Marta

(as far as I've understood people go in Santa Maria only to visit this nature reserve and the nearby mountain Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, an isolated mountain range, the highest in Colombia. The altitude of 5780 m - Cristobal Colon mountain. On the peaks are eternal snow, glaciers). In the country there are a lot of National Parks! Having absorbed all the local color and going through the local market, we boarded the bus and went to the reserve. Finally, we hoped very much to swim in the sea. Because what we saw in the city caused a concern of picking up some sore.
Entrance:

Surf Camp:
At the entrance we were checked up by the police officers. They shook up all backpacks. We have regretted that we had not used the age-old principle - everything prohibited - to women, because our predecessors (among whom was a girl from Alaska!) were taken away a bottle of whiskey which began to be strenuously utilized right here - at the checkpoint. We passed through the border, but after viewing the prices on the entrance, we turned around and decided that we didn't need that. Fortunately, the guys drinking whiskey, were waiting for the minibus that was supposed to bring them in a surf camp nearby, in fact behind the fence of the reserve. As we weren't going to study the local flora and fauna and to stay for the night in the tent, without hesitation, we acceded to the company:

Honestly, this was my first time in such a place - and that was much more interesting:

By the time of our arrival at the camp, I had fully disconnected the head and stopped to think about everything. Therefore, even didn't ask myself how we would get out of here in a couple of hours, taking into account the fact that the guy who brought us here will be able to take us only tomorrow, the transport doesn't get here, and in the evening we need to be on the way to another city.
Conveniences. By the way, we had a chance to use the shower:

Among holidaymakers here are young people mainly from America (well, also we met here that girl from Alaska). It seems to be owned by some guy who lives here for six months and rents a bungalow, then he is replaced by another 'owner' and so on:

'Rooms':

Prices were quite modest and, in principle, it was possible to stay, but we had no water, no products with us:

My friend told me that all such places are the same and, for example, in India, everything looks the same, but for me it was a novelty, so after quickly bathing and drying in the sun, I ran to take pictures. This is a kind of vip room:

... and this is a hostel:

I had been surprised already on the way to

Santa Marta

the day before that the sea is completely not blue, but rather grey:

The weather changed several times during those couple of hours that we spent on the beach - it is strange that it didn't start raining:

But in general it was fun to swim and watch from the water as the weather was changing over the Sierra Nevada massif and watch the color of the sky:

Returning to the question of how we got back to the city (and we not only returned, to a great surprise of the guys from the camp, but we still got in time on the bus to Barranquilla). So - we went on foot:

Here we came upon a plantation of bananas. That's the way they grow:

Along a country road, through palm forest and along the banana plantation, we came to the freeway (by the way, we were going not more than for 30 minutes) and began to catch the bus to the city. Fortunately, to get on the regular route bus you don't have to go to the nearest bus stop (it would be nice to know where is that stop), it's enough just to raise your hand - the bus will stop and take you to your destination for the official price:

Local currency:
Author: pingvin-fly
Source: pingvin-fly.livejournal.com
Translated by: Gian Luka

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